Training Series Details
Series Title: Narrative Practices: History and Principles of Narrative Practices and Externalizing Problems (2 Day)
Availability: Employees and Eligible Participants
Available spaces: None - Roster is full
Classes in Series:

12/1/2023 9:00 AM-1:00 PM
Webinar - refer to the class description section for more information about how to participate.
[ Online ]
[ Online ], CA 94618

Narrative Practices Part 2: Modern Power, Re-Authoring and the Absent but Implicit
12/8/2023 9:00 AM-1:00 PM
Webinar - refer to the class description section for more information about how to participate.
[ Online ]
[ Online ], CA 94618
Trainers: Michael Mertz
Series Description:

Narrative Practices (Part 1): History and Principles of Narrative Practices and Externalizing Problems

 

Training Summary: Provide a couple sentences summary (content themes/training techniques, and how this training is relevant to working with children who live in out of home care.):

 

This training is designed to provide an introduction to Narrative Practices for clinical staff, counseling staff, and non-professionals who work with foster youth. Participants will learn about the history of Narrative Practices and the underlying assumptions of the work.  Emphasis will be placed on how the approach was born out of a desire to center notions of social justice within the helping professions. Participants will learn about the process of separating problems from people (externalizing) and have opportunities to practice this skill.

 

Class Objectives: (what knowledge, ideas or skills will participants explore, learn, and practice etc. during the training) 

  • Identify two key underlying assumptions of narrative practices
  • Articulate key components of the Externalizing Conversations Map
  • Practice one externalizing problems conversation.

 

How can participants utilize their new skills and knowledge after the training to reinforce their learning?

  • Participants will utilize new knowledge of Narrative Practices to guide work with youth and families, including exploring intentional understandings and identifying alternative stories
  • Participants will use the re-authoring map to practice skills outside of the training and implement in daily work.

 

 

Narrative Practices (Part 2): Modern Power, Re-Authoring and the Absent but Implicit

 

Training Summary: Provide a couple sentences summary (content themes/training techniques, and how this training is relevant to working with children who live in out of home care.):

 

This training will build on the Narrative Practices 1 training by introducing more of the assumptions and specific practices related to the model. Participants will learn about the notion of intentional understandings in contrast to an understanding that locates ‘strengths’ and ‘weaknesses’ internally. Participants will learn about and practice the skill of identifying alternative stories about people that are obscured by dominant problem stories. The re-authoring map of Narrative Practice will be presented to the group with time to practice using this tool.  The practice of writing ‘therapeutic documents’ following conversations with clients will be explained and several examples will be discussed.

 

Class Objectives: (what knowledge, ideas or skills will participants explore, learn, and practice etc. during the training) 

  • Articulate the idea of modern power and its effects on people’s lives
  • Identify the core elements of the Re-Authoring Map of Narrative Practice
  • Practice one re-authoring conversation

 

How can participants utilize their new skills and knowledge after the training to reinforce their learning?

  • Participants will continue to practice the skill of identifying alternative stories about people that are obscured by dominant problem stories within their program.
  • Participants will introduce more of the assumptions and specific practices related to the model in their program

 

TRAINER BIO:

MIKE MERTZ is a Training Content and Delivery Director for Seneca Family of Agencies as well as a National Family Finding and Engagement Trainer with the National Institute for Permanent Family Connections. Mike helped to create Seneca Family of Agencies Diversity, Equity and Inclusion initiative and advisory board. He has been with Seneca since 1986 working in residential, school and community-based programs. His focus is on collaborative practices with youth and families including Narrative Therapy practices, Appreciative Inquiry and Solution Focused practices. Mike has provided trainings on Family Finding and Engagement and Narrative Practices throughout the United States, Canada and Australia.

 

 

IMPORTANT

You must work with dependent (foster& probation) youth in Alameda, Contra Costa, Solano, San Francisco or Monterey County in order to attend our trainings. Trainings are free for those eligible to attend.

 


 CERTIFICATES

Completion Certificates can be obtained by emailing:

CERTIFICATES@senecacenter.org

 

REFUND/CANCELLATION POLICY

All registered participants must cancel 48 hours in advance, if no longer

able to attend. Cancellation can be done electronically through

registration confirmation email or by calling:

Seneca Family of Agencies - Training Department at (510) 654-4004

 

Seneca Institute for Advanced Practice

8945 Golf Links Road, Oakland, CA 94605

(510) 654-4004 x2244

training@senecacenter.org

 

In accordance with California Civil Code Section 54.1 any disabled person who may require accommodations (transportation) to participate in any trainings or events, please contact the Training Department at 510-654-4004 at least 5 days in advance of the event.

Trainings provided by Seneca Family of Agencies, in partnership with Chabot-Las Positas Community College District and the Counties of Alameda, Contra Costa, and Solano. Monterey training provided in partnership with Hartnell College and Monterey County. Funding provided through Title IV-E.